Turning A Page

Jon Lance Bacon, the screenwriter of our upcoming Oh Crappy Day feature, has just published an essay in a collection called Approaches to Teaching the Works of Flannery O’Connor.

In his essay, “Restoring Connections: An Interdisciplinary Perspective on Wise Blood,” Lance discusses the portrayal of World War II veterans in O’Connor’s 1952 novel and a 1946 film drama called Till the End of Time. Over the years, Lance has written many works of literary criticism and cultural analysis, including his 1993 book, Flannery O’Connor and Cold War Culture, published by Cambridge University Press.

The new essay collection, published by the Modern Language Association (MLA), is now available on Amazon.

IMG_2186 (1).jpg

Dressed for Success

As we near the end of the editing process, we’re gratified to see the many parts of our film coming together. One of the key elements, naturally, is wardrobe. Luckily, we found a great wardrobe supervisor in Ruth Bryan.

In addition to designing and sewing costumes, Ruth put us in touch with Cheryl Fraser, owner of Galatea Boutique in Raleigh. We needed a funky, bohemian look for the character of Meghan, played by Jaime Wallace, and Cheryl lent us several outfits that worked perfectly.

We can’t thank Cheryl enough for her kindness and generosity. Whenever Meghan appears onscreen, we’re reminded of Galatea — one of many local businesses who helped us bring Oh Crappy Day to life!

In a scene from  Oh Crappy Day , Jaime Wallace (Meghan) wears an embroidered jacket provided by Galatea Boutique of Raleigh. With her, from left to right, are Loosha Jones (Marcus) and Jordan Estes (Jared).

In a scene from Oh Crappy Day, Jaime Wallace (Meghan) wears an embroidered jacket provided by Galatea Boutique of Raleigh. With her, from left to right, are Loosha Jones (Marcus) and Jordan Estes (Jared).

Our Tribute to Classic Hollywood

When you make a movie, you focus primarily on the big picture — the most effective combination of characters, actions, dialogue, and imagery. At the same time, though, you have to be aware of a thousand small details — everything from the style of a shirt to the type of car a character drives.

In the case of Oh Crappy Day, the script called for a diner with photos of old-time movie stars covering its walls. We had a filming location that fit the bill perfectly — a Raleigh favorite called Hayes Barton Café & Dessertery, which already had a collection of Hollywood headshots. 

There was just one problem: if we planned to film these specific headshots, we would have to get permission for each and every image, from whatever estate or company held the rights. The cost would have been prohibitive, in terms of time as well as money. 

So, instead, we decided to create our own “movie stars.” We started searching for models with a “look” that suggested classic Hollywood. We studied movie-star portraits from the 1920s to the 1960s, to familiarize ourselves with changing styles of clothing, hair, and lighting. We rummaged through attics and costume shops for vintage clothes and jewelry. Most importantly, we found a talented young photographer, Jonathan Okafo.

Finally, we met the models at a Durham studio, where we styled them and Jonathan worked his magic. It took several weekends in 2018, and more time afterwards for digital touch-ups, but we had all the headshots we needed to dress  our set — long before we started principal photography in February 2019.

All in all, we had a lot of fun creating our “movie stars,” and the photos look great in the scenes we filmed at Hayes-Barton Café!

Ryan-Photos1-2-3.jpg

In the photos above and below, you can see how we transformed two of our friends. Ryan Headley became a star of the 1940s, while Mayerlin Muñoz became a star of the 1950s.

Mayerlin-Photos1-2-3.jpg

And here’s how their headshots looked on one of the walls at our filming location, Hayes Barton Café and Dessertery.

IMG_1459 (1).jpg

Goodbye, Mission Valley

As part of the Raleigh filmmaking (and filmgoing) community, we’re saddened to hear that Mission Valley Cinema has closed after almost half a century.

We have a special connection with Mission Valley, which opened in March 1973. Earlier this year, we had the honor of filming a scene in the lobby for our upcoming Oh Crappy Day feature. It was the perfect location, filled with cinematic history, including film reels and a vintage 35mm projector.

We’re proud we could preserve a bit of that history, in a scene depicting the colorful decor of the lobby. We’ll always be grateful to the manager and employees of Mission Valley for helping us with our filmshoot.

In the lobby of Mission Valley Cinema, Loosha Jones (left) and Jordan Estes rehearse a key scene for the  Oh Crappy Day  feature. Photo by Jonathan Okafo. Copyright © 2019 Dagtype Films, LLC.

In the lobby of Mission Valley Cinema, Loosha Jones (left) and Jordan Estes rehearse a key scene for the Oh Crappy Day feature. Photo by Jonathan Okafo. Copyright © 2019 Dagtype Films, LLC.

Left to right: Steven P. Neilson, executive producer of  Oh Crappy Day , checks out the lobby of Mission Valley Cinema, while Duane Therriault, our 2nd assistant director, gets extras ready for the next shot. Photo by Jonathan Okafo. Copyright © 2019 Dagtype Films, LLC.

Left to right: Steven P. Neilson, executive producer of Oh Crappy Day, checks out the lobby of Mission Valley Cinema, while Duane Therriault, our 2nd assistant director, gets extras ready for the next shot. Photo by Jonathan Okafo. Copyright © 2019 Dagtype Films, LLC.

Deep in the Heart of Texas

This weekend, Writer-Director Jon Lance Bacon is representing "Oh Crappy Day" at the 26th Annual OCD Conference. It took him 13 hours to get from Raleigh, North Carolina, to Austin, Texas, but all the flight delays were worth the trouble -- considering the work the International OCD Foundation does to raise OCD awareness.

Tonight at 8 PM, the short that inspired our "OCD" feature will screen as part of an event called "Film Fights Back: An OCD Short Film Festival." The festival includes another love story, “Misdirection,” and two documentaries: “OCD Is Not Me” and “UNSTUCK: An OCD Kids Movie,” produced by our friend, Chris Baier. Following the screening, Lance and Chris will answer questions from the audience.

Extras Needed for the “Oh Crappy Day” Feature

In just a few weeks, we’ll start shooting our Oh Crappy Day feature in Raleigh, and we need background extras for scenes in restaurants, museums, etc. The shoot for this romantic comedy runs from Sunday, February 24, to Thursday, March 14. We’ll need people of all ages, well-dressed, in winter clothing. Extras will get food and refreshments, credit in the finished film, and admission to our local premiere. If you’re interested, please contact Duane at dagtypefilms@ymail.com and attach a full-length photo of yourself. We’ll be listing specific days and locations in another post, but you can go ahead and get on our list now. And be sure to share this announcement with any friends or family who might be interested, too!

Dagtype Films Helps Bring Acclaimed Short Film Concert to Raleigh

January 13, 2017
FOR IMMEDIATE USE

Raleigh, NC – Dagtype Films and the Longleaf Film Festival have partnered to bring Asbury Shorts, New York City’s longest-running short-film exhibition and travel show, to North Carolina for the first time in the film concert's 35-year history. As part of the North Carolina Museum of History's First Fridays series, the film concert will take place at the museum on March 3rd, 7:30 PM. Film producer Steven Neilson will be the guest host. Tickets are $15 and available at LongleafFilmFestival.com

Asbury Shorts concerts combine award-winning films from the past with new global festival honorees, creating a rare opportunity for audiences to watch world-class short films on the big screen. Academy Award–nominated director Jason Reitman calls Asbury Shorts, “the best short-film show I’ve ever seen.”

The program on March 3rd will feature multiple short films from among the best in comedy, drama, and animation. Among the films to be screened are three that were nominated for Oscars.

"This is truly a unique opportunity for local filmmakers and film lovers to come together to see some of the best short films in a fantastic venue," says host and film producer Steven Neilson. 

Neilson and writer-director Jon Lance Bacon founded Dagtype Films in 2005. Their short film "Oh Crappy Day" was filmed in Raleigh and has played at more than 35 film festivals, winning 11 awards along the way. "Oh Crappy Day" will also be featured among the films screening at the Asbury Shorts film concert on March 3rd.  

“We are excited to partner with Dagtype Films to host the North Carolina premiere of the Asbury Short film concert,” says Sally Bloom, Longleaf Film Festival organizer. “We believe that our home base, the North Carolina Museum of History, is a terrific place for these stories in film to be shared.”

In addition to the Asbury Shorts at 7:30 PM, the museum's lobby-level exhibits will be open from 5 to 9, and local band Castle Wild will be playing live from 6:30 to 7:30. Craft beer and concessions will be available for purchase throughout the evening.

Neilson is looking forward to a fun event and an engaged crowd. "We're thrilled to be partnering with Longleaf for this exciting event. And we hope we can bring more great programs like Asbury Shorts to Raleigh in the future." 

For more information, contact Steven Neilson, Dagtype Films, 919-673-2402; Sally Bloom, Longleaf Film Festival, 919-807-7965; or Doug LeClaire, Asbury Shorts USA, 718-510- 6929.